Usable Pasts: Traditions and Group Expressions in North by Tad Tuleja

By Tad Tuleja

In Usable Pasts, fourteen authors study the manipulation of conventional expressions between numerous teams from the U.S. and Canada: the advance of a pictorial kind via Navajo weavers in line with investors, Mexican American responses to the appropriation of conventional meals via Anglos, the expressive sorts of communique that engender and maintain a feeling of neighborhood in an African American women's social membership and between aged Yiddish folksingers in Miami seashore, the incorporation of mass media pictures into the "C&Ts" (customs and traditions) of a Boy Scout troop, the altering which means in their defining Exodus-like migration to Mormons, Newfoundlanders' appropriation during the rum-drinking ritual known as the Schreech-In of outsiders' stereotypes, outsiders' imposition of the once-despised lobster because the brand of Maine, the competition over Texas's heroic Alamo legend and its departures from ancient truth, and the way yellow ribbons have been reworked from a picture in a pop track to a countrywide image of "resolve."

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Usable Pasts: Traditions and Group Expressions in North America

In Usable Pasts, fourteen authors study the manipulation of conventional expressions between quite a few teams from the USA and Canada: the improvement of a pictorial variety by way of Navajo weavers in accordance with investors, Mexican American responses to the appropriation of conventional meals via Anglos, the expressive varieties of verbal exchange that engender and maintain a feeling of group in an African American women's social membership and between aged Yiddish folksingers in Miami seashore, the incorporation of mass media pictures into the "C&Ts" (customs and traditions) of a Boy Scout troop, the altering which means in their defining Exodus-like migration to Mormons, Newfoundlanders' appropriation during the rum-drinking ritual known as the Schreech-In of outsiders' stereotypes, outsiders' imposition of the once-despised lobster because the brand of Maine, the competition over Texas's heroic Alamo legend and its departures from ancient truth, and the way yellow ribbons have been reworked from a picture in a pop track to a countrywide image of "resolve.

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Extra resources for Usable Pasts: Traditions and Group Expressions in North America

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33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 47 became popular with the weavers to dye both the traders’ commercially spun yarns and their own hand-spun yarn. Needless to say, considerable time was gained in the overall production of a blanket when the weaver no longer had to wash, card, and spin her own wool as well as gather ingredients for natural dyes. : Treasure Chest Publications, 1953), 210. Bertha P. Dutton, American Indians of the Southwest (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1983), 233. Founded in Oregon in 1895, the Pendleton Woolen Mills made their reputation through the manufacture of their “Indian pattern” blankets, which quickly became popular with Indians and whites alike.

Herein lies the power and the spirit of the Navajo pictorial. Notes 1. ” 2. After World War II all southwestern Indian artifacts, including blankets and rugs, began to gradually make the subtle transition from “curios” or “collectibles” to “Native American art” made specifically for tourists and the fine arts market; hence these more recent weavings are not viable examples for this discussion. 3. All descriptive attributes were accumulated over two years of research, including discussions with a great many traders, dealers, and collectors.

Dutton, 1985), 2. Kent, Navajo Weaving, 3. Oliver LaFarge and John Sloan, Introduction to American Indian Art, Exhibition Catalog for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts (New York: Diamond Press, 1931), 5–7, 17–21. Ibid, 17–21. Edwin L. Wade and Rennard Strickland, Magic Images: Contemporary Native American Art, Exhibition Catalog for Philbrook Art Center (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1981), 5. 48 Usable Pasts 39. Henry Glassie, The Spirit of Folk Art (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1989), 45.

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